Behind the scenes at Virtual University of Uganda

P1090476our campus in Kampala

Virtual University of Uganda (VUU) was granted a licence from the Uganda National Council for Higher Education in 2011, and we have been growing steadily since. We are proud to be pioneering elearning in Uganda and the region, and we are gradually becoming more well known even outside the continent. We had our first graduation in July and it was a colourful and happy occasion presided over by our Chancellor Lady Justice Flavia Senoga Anglin. Our friends on Facebook number almost 27,000, and we are also very visible on Twitter and Google+.

Our students come from, among other places, Uganda, the Philippines, the UK, Belgium, Tanzania, Malawi, South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea, Burundi, and Kenya, including a number of Ugandan professionals living abroad). Our staff are sourced globally, regionally, and nationally and represent Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands, England, Scotland, Uganda, Tanzania, Cameron, Italy, and Bolivia. We are a hard-working group and undertake all our tasks with professionalism and integrity.

Our Vice Chancellor is the veteran Belgian educationalist Professor Dr Michel Lejeune. He studied in Belgium, Oxford, and Canada, and holds two PhD degrees from Louvain. Having been a high court judge in Belgium, he was the founder Vice Chancellor at Uganda Martyrs University, and later the Deputy Executive Director at the Uganda National Council for Higher Education.  Those of you who know him, will remember that he is uncompromising about quality in higher education.

Michel pic

Second in command is Professor Dr Deirdre Carabine, Director of Programmes (Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs). She studied in Belfast, Paris, Munich, and Dublin, and is also the holder of two PhDs. She came to Uganda in 1993 to work at Uganda Martyrs University, and by the time she left, she was Deputy Vice Chancellor (AA), having also headed the Institute of Ethics and Development Studies and set up the School of Postgraduate Studies. She then founded International Health Sciences University before moving on to become founder Vice Chancellor at Virtual University of Uganda. She is passionate about online learning and has overall responsibility to ensure that all teaching and learning materials are of the best possible quality. She is also chief editor for the VUU Open Access Resources Series.

Carabine

The Chairman of our Board of Trustees is Professor Dr Charles Olweny, senior oncologist and educationalist, and previously VC at Uganda Martyrs University; the Chairman of our University Governing Council is Professor Dr Patrick Mangheni, formerly CEO of RENU, the Research and Education Network of Uganda. The other members of our full-time staff include Ms Lindo Victoria Ndagire, University Secretary in the Registry, and Mr Vincent Oloya in the Finance Office. All other staff members are contracted to teach courses in their areas of expertise. Our current programme leaders are Dr Ashis Brahma (Holland), Professor Adalbertus Kamanzi (Tanzania), Drs Arjan de Jaeger (The Netherlands), and Drs Jimmy Opoka (Uganda). I think you will agree that we are a diverse but well-qualified team.

It is because we have a very sleek physical infrastructure that we can concentrate on quality multi-media materials that make the student learning experience more enjoyable. This is what our Learning Platform looks like:

Moodle

You simply log on, go to your classroom, and learn! Simple. And we are always on hand to help you. We are proud of the fact that we offer premier student support both within and outside traditional office hours. So you do not have to travel to the university EVER: except perhaps if you wish to attend graduation! All registration, learning, Live Classes, and examinations are done online. All you need is a reliable internet connection. No more traffic jams as you struggle to reach the university at 6.00pm four evenings a week! Learn while you earn, as we say, and, most conveniently, learn at your own pace and in your own place!

If you would like to be part of this revolution in learning, visit our website to find out more about us. Currently, we offer Master’s degrees in Public Health, ICT4Development, Executive MBA (with Oil and Gas specialization and Hospitality Management coming soon), and MA International Development. We also offer a number of free online course each year (called LOOCs — Little Open Online Courses). These lead to postgraduate certification. We also offer training programmes for university staff who wish to learn how to be an online lecturer or how to manage an eLearning Platform.

To contact us, visit the website,  phone Victoria on +256 312 202137 or +256 772 202137, or mail Victoria at infovuu@virtualuni.ac.ug. You can also call in to our campus at 425 Zzimwe (Church) Road, Muyenga, Kampala (opposite Tankhill Parade).

We look forward to welcoming you as our student!

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Uganda’s First LOOC

Virtual University of Uganda
Postgraduate Certificate Course: Project Management for Development
18 May – 20 June 2015
Uganda’s first open online course!

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You may have heard of MOOCs, well, we at VUU have just opened our first LOOC: that means: Little Open Online Course. We have around 25 students registered — our target class size. We hope that more people will become familiar with online learning and perhaps sign up for a full degree course.

We are excited to be on the frontline of online education in the region.

We shall be offering another topical short course mid-October to mid-November.

Virtual University of Uganda: Collaborations

VUU is currently collaborating with Mbarara University of Science and Technology (Uganda) and University of Africa (South Africa / Zambia)

      MUST Logo    logo

With MUST, we are sharing our Information and Communications Technology for Development programme, and with UoA our Executive MBA programme. In this way, we hope to strengthen partnerships and raise the benchmark for the quality of our learning materials.

To learn more about us, visit our website at: http://www.virtualuni.ac.ug

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Virtual University of Uganda and Mbarara University of Science and Technology

VUU and MUST are pleased to announce the new programme: Ict4D

MUST : VUU advert

PG Diploma and MSc Icts for Development (ICT4D)

ICT (information and communications technology – or technologies) is an umbrella term that includes any communication device or application,
encompassing: radio, television, cellular phones, computer and network
hardware and software, satellite systems and so on, as well as the
various services and applications associated with them, such as
videoconferencing and distance learning.1

Rationale
It is a well-known fact that KNOWLEDGE = power, health, and, oftentimes, wealth. In this age of super-fast global communication and the vast resources available on the world-wide-web, ICTs are changing the way we do business, learn, and communicate, and there are few excuses for those in “developed” countries not to equip themselves with empowering knowledge. And while information itself is important, we must know where to get it, how to get it, and what to do with it.

While it is true that the majority of the world’s peoples are cut off from access to knowledge and information – and there are many reasons for this North-South divide – recent years have seen a huge increase in the number of people in the “developing” world becoming connected and accessing knowledge. As of May 2014, Uganda’s population was recorded in excess of 36.3 million of which around 20% had internet access.2 While this represents only a small percentage of the country’s population and is small in relation to the more than 2 billion internet users worldwide, nevertheless it is a laudable statistic that is slowly being reflected in changing ideas and raising expectations. Interestingly, more than 50% of the population possesses a mobile phone!

Until relatively recently, ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) were generally seen as specialized and often mysterious. For example, in the not-so-distant past, the computers in an organization were controlled by an ICT Manager or Systems Administrator who had absolute power in terms of how and access. With more and more people owning and setting up a laptop without the need for a Systems Administrator, the introduction of more friendly user interfaces, social networking, and cloud computing, much of the mystery has been taken out of ICTs for the average computer user.

Information and Communication Technologies are used either directly by the target groups (the population) or indirectly to assist organizations such as NGOs to improve socio-economic conditions in developing countries. For organizations such as NGOs, ICTs provide a useful tool for sustainable development and an absolute need in emergency situations. However, there is a lack of capacity in developing countries to develop, maintain, and utilize the ICT resources. This has been noted as a significant cause for failure of ICT projects.

But ICTs comprise much more than computers and how to use them. At the individual level, mobile phones, tablets, digital radios… are knowledge access points, while mobile money eases financial transactions. At the national level, the use of ICTs includes mHealth systems, eTaxation systems, eBanking, eGovernance …

As organizations such as: infoDev and ICT4Dev demonstrate, ICTs have many roles to play in almost every area of life: democracy, banking, retailing, education, marketing, gender, business, public health, human rights, environment, governance, agriculture, the media, health …. Innovative solutions to some development problems are emerging at a very fast rate, for example, the introduction of the mobile money networks made the fast transfer of cash relatively simple, while at the same time saving travel money and eliminating the need for difficult paperwork in a bank. The text services for rural farmers (while still suffering from a number of drawbacks) ideally makes it easier for farmers to stay up-to-date with current market prices, and the same service used in health service provision in rural areas has certainly seen an increase in those accessing health care (mHealth). However, many ICT4Dev projects fail because of poor management or collapse once donor funding has been withdrawn. A gap in this area is clearly seen.

In order for the Virtual University of Uganda to remain relevant to the practical development needs of the country (and indeed the region), and as a university offering online education, it is logical that one of our programmes is ICT related. When we set up the programme (which is accredited by the National Council for Higher Education – 17 July 2012) we received many suggestions from prospective students to offer traditional ICT courses; however, we believe that other universities have sufficient coverage of that area.We thought it was time to offer a specific tailor-made postgraduate programme in ICT4Dev. Our programme, offers not only courses on programming, computer languages, hardware and software, we also concentrate on the latest interventions and innovations that impact significantly on development encouraging our students to think outside the traditional ICT box while embedding ICTs in the whole area of development theory and praxis.

We are the only university on Sub-Saharan Africa offering the programme (with the exception of South Africa).3 This means that we are at the cutting edge of academic developments in the field.

Aims and Objectives
It is precisely because many innovative ICT4Dev projects fail outright, are not sustainable nor contextualized, that the region needs experts who have both the knowledge and the skills necessary to implement and manage ICT4Dev projects successfully. The programme will, therefore, aim to train innovators with “technical competencies” and “contextual competencies” to fulfill this function.

On completion of the programme, students will:
understand the contextual frameworks of development in all aspects
understand how ICTs impact on development
be enabled to link development theory with ICT practice
have the knowledge to engage critically with the role of ICTs in development
be familiar with the key debates in ICT4dev
have a thorough understanding of the basic concepts of ICT
have thorough insight in the technical skills of GIS, visual representation,
have a thorough insight in the application of ICT in one of the following sectors: education, health, finance
possess the competences to enable them to handle practical aspects of ICT4D projects such as sound project management, stakeholder
analysis
have the skills to keep themselves up-to-date in the field of ICT
have the skills to adapt new upcoming ICT technologies to local conditions.

Programme Structure4

PGDID 101: World development today 3 CU**

PGDICT 101: Introduction to ICT4D 3 CU

PGDID 103: Development projects: planning and management 3 CU

PGDICT 102: Hardware and networking for development 3 CU

PGDICT 103: Software and databases for development 3 CU

PGDICT 104: New internet based paradigms – moving to the cloud 3 CU

PGDICT 105: Information systems design and implementation 3 CU

PGDICT 106: ICT policy and regulation 3 CU

PGDVUU 102: Ethics and integrity in technology 3 CU

PGDVUU 101: Research Methodology 3 CU

Total Credit Units: Postgraduate Diploma: 33 CU

* These courses may also be taken as stand-alone certificate courses as part of Continuous Professional Development.

** Lecturing hours, practical hours and others are not included in this structure because these are not applicable to online courses. However, it is expected that students spend at least 8 hours per week on the learning platform; this includes 1 Live Classroom (1 hour per week) and 2 Chat sessions (2 hours per week).

Continuation to Master’s Dissertation

On successful completion of the eleven courses leading to a PG Diploma, having gained a CGPA of at least 3.0 in the taught courses, candidates may be qualified to register as Master’s candidates and proceed to work on the dissertation which will be supervised by a regional / international expert in the field of study chosen.

MSCPH 201 Dissertation (MSc) 7 CU

Total Credit Units Master of Science: 40 CU

Programme Duration

The programme takes two calendar years to complete the PDG in Information and Communications Technology for Development. The dissertation takes a further six months to complete.

Programme Leader:

Dr Arjan de Jager, BSc, MSc, Ph.D, Information Manager at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and previously Senior advisor at The Center of Expertise, Programme & Country Manager Uganda at IICD, and Lecturer / Coordinator at Hogeschool van Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Programme Manager:

Professor Dr Deirdre Carabine, BA, MA, PhD (QUB), PhD (NUI), Director of Programmes, VUU

Programme Administrator:
Mrs Victoria Lindo Ndagire, BA, MA (MUK), University Secretary, VUU

1 http://searchcio.techtarget.com/definition/ICT-information-and-communications-technology-or-technologies; accessed 15 January 2015.

2 State of Internet Freedoms in Uganda 2014, accessed at: http://opennetafrica.org/wpcontent/uploads/researchandpubs/State%20of%20Internet%20Freedoms%20in%20Uganda%202014.pdf; accessed 15 January 2015.

3 http://www.cs.uct.ac.za/about-us/newsletters/fd.pdf; accessed 15 January 2015.

4 In order to remain relevant, all courses are revised after being on the learning platform for two calendar years.

Join Us Online

Admissions are open for our online postgraduate programmes. Learning online is one way to stay at work and at the same time study. Our technologies support very learner-friendly programmes, and we are always there for you. Image

If you are in Kampala, call in to our lovely campus in Muyenga (Reste Corner), or visit our website to find out more about us: www.virtualuni.ac.ug